The Differences Between Factoring and Invoice Discounting and Which One is Right for Your Business

As a business owner, one of the most crucial aspects of managing your finances is managing your cash flow. If you have customers who take a long time to pay their invoices, it can create a cash flow gap that can be difficult to fill. This is where factoring and invoice discounting can help. Both of these financing options provide businesses with a way to access cash quickly by using their unpaid invoices as collateral. However, they work in different ways and offer different benefits. In this article, we will explore the differences between factoring and invoice discounting, and help you determine which option is right for your business.

What is Factoring?

Factoring is a financing option where a business sells its unpaid invoices to a factoring company, also known as a factor. In exchange, the factor pays the business a percentage of the value of the invoice upfront, typically between 70-90%. The factor then collects payment from the customer directly and takes a fee for their services. Once the invoice is paid, the factor pays the remaining balance to the business, minus their fee.

Factoring can be a good option for businesses that need cash quickly and are willing to give up a portion of the value of their invoices in exchange for immediate payment. Factors typically do not require businesses to have a strong credit history, as they are more concerned with the creditworthiness of the business’s customers.

What is Invoice Discounting?

Invoice discounting is a financing option that also involves using unpaid invoices to access cash quickly. However, unlike factoring, the business retains control over the collection of their invoices. With invoice discounting, a business borrows money against the value of their invoices from a lender and uses those funds to meet their immediate cash flow needs. When the customer pays their invoice, the business repays the lender, plus interest and fees.

Invoice discounting can be a good option for businesses that want to retain control over the collection of their invoices but need access to cash quickly. Invoice discounting typically requires businesses to have a strong credit history, as the lender is more concerned with the creditworthiness of the business itself.

Key Differences Between Factoring and Invoice Discounting

Control over Collection Process

One of the most significant differences between factoring and invoice discounting is the control over the collection process. With factoring, the factor takes control over the collection of the invoice. This means that the factor contacts the customer directly to collect payment, and the customer is aware that the invoice has been sold to a third party. With invoice discounting, the business retains control over the collection process, and the customer may not be aware that the business has borrowed against their invoice.

Customer Awareness

As mentioned earlier, factoring involves the factor contacting the customer directly to collect payment. This means that the customer is aware that the invoice has been sold to a third party. With invoice discounting, the customer may not be aware that the business has borrowed against their invoice, as the business retains control over the collection process.

Creditworthiness Requirements

Factors are more concerned with the creditworthiness of the business’s customers, while lenders for invoice discounting are more concerned with the creditworthiness of the business itself. This means that businesses with strong customer bases but weaker credit histories may find factoring to be a better option. Conversely, businesses with strong credit histories may find invoice discounting to be a better option.

Overall, factoring and invoice discounting are both effective ways for businesses to access cash quickly by using their outstanding invoices as collateral. The choice between the two will depend on the specific needs and preferences of your business, and it’s important to evaluate the costs and benefits of each option before making a decision.

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